lessons learned

  • Globe on Businessman Hand

    Considering International Expansion? Get Ready To Think Outside Your Comfort Zone

    May 16, 2017 | By: | In: Innovation Psychology, Strategies

    Globalization is great for business: it opens up new markets and allows businesses to bring in revenue and talent from all over the world. However, the first steps into international expansion can be fraught with growing pains, forcing companies to waste time and money on efforts that don’t gain any traction in foreign markets. To avoid this, company leaders have to get ready to embrace change and innovation outside their normal comfort zone. Here’s why it’s important to get comfortable with discomfort when you’re considering international expansion.

  • transferring-innovation-skills-to-newbies-fact-or-fiction

    Transferring Innovation Skills to Newbies: Fact or Fiction?

    March 7, 2017 | By: | In: Creative Leadership

    Expert innovators know from experience how to innovate while minimizing hassle, needless tasks and wasted effort – they’ve been successful (and unsuccessful) countless times through trial and error. Using flight simulators and surgical learning tools as examples, it’s been proven that teaching veteran skills to ‘newbies’ isn’t science-fiction, especially in more ‘exact’ disciplines such as medicine and math. But is it possible to design a crash-course that teaches young and inexperienced innovators the less-definable skills, attitudes and insights necessary to ideate, champion and implement without having to go through all the awkwardness of being a rookie? We think so, and here’s why.

  • lessons-of-steve-jobs

    Lessons of Steve Jobs

    February 8, 2017 | By: | In: Videos

    Guy Kawasaki is the author of APE, What the Plus!, Enchantment, and nine other books. He has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College. He is the co-founder of Alltop.com, an “online magazine rack” of popular topics on the web. Previously, he was the chief evangelist of Apple. In this talk Kawasaki shares 12 lessons he learned about life and work while working with Steve Jobs.

  • think-like-an-innovator

    Inspiring Business Lessons from the World’s Greatest Thinkers and Innovators

    December 7, 2016 | By: | In: Book Reviews

    Otto von Bismarck once said, “Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others.” In Paul Sloane’s latest book, Think Like an Innovator, you will learn from the struggles and accomplishments of 76 of the world’s greatest thinkers: artists, business leaders, geniuses, inventors, mavericks, pioneers, scientists and visionaries.

  • opening-the-floodgates-of-innovation

    Opening the Floodgates of Innovation: Insights from Deloitte Innovation Day

    June 27, 2016 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    Take a quick glance around your office. What do you see? Categorically “Start-up” types in t-shirts and jeans passing bottles of craft beer around? Or “Suits”, with their collars starched to perfection, hunched over their laptops and scrambling away at emails? What would happen if we flipped these scenarios around? I for one, would love to see my accountant rock up to work in a Hawaiian Shirt; a calculator in one hand, and a piña colada in the other. But what difference would this make?

  • how-to-turn-a-failure-into-a-wild-success

    How to Turn a Failure into a Wild Success

    March 21, 2016 | By: | In: Enabling Factors

    After six months of hard work, we were sitting together on a warm spring afternoon enjoying a beer in one of Melbourne’s new hipster bars. We had learned a lot, traveled all over Australia and met amazingly passionate people. We’d put together a lean startup with a focus to test a simple business idea and we’d heard countless times how much our tools were needed. There was only one problem. We had failed.

  • recognizing-skills-and-weaknesses

    Recognizing Skills and Weaknesses

    March 9, 2016 | By: | In: Videos

    Lands’ End CEO Federica Marchionni discusses the importance of recognizing weaknesses as opportunities for growth. She uses the clothing company’s push to open a 9,000-square-foot flagship store in New York City in just six weeks as an example of an opportunity for her company to prove that it could be quick and nimble under intense pressure.

  • dont-default-to-startup

    Don’t Default to Startup

    October 13, 2015 | By: | In: Videos

    William Marshall, co-founder and CEO of Planet Labs, says that starting a business should not be the first response to every pain point in the market, but decided only after it becomes clear that there is no other solution. Marshall also describes how passion and a breakthrough idea, not business skills or an MBA, are central to entrepreneurship.

  • evaluation-and-innovation

    Evaluation and Innovation

    September 30, 2015 | By: | In: Creative Leadership

    The words evaluation and innovation are not often put together in one sentence. Most companies believe that measurement has a negative effect on creativity and innovation —it is seen as a control tool that harms, rather than supports, reflection and learning. While data is seen as a valuable source of discovering new trends and user needs, it is rarely used to measure internal innovation progress and capability. Because we see measurement as stifling innovation and creativity, companies rarely track the information needed to determine creative ability and innovation success. In fact, many organizations end up ignoring the issue all together.

  • dont-be-afraid-of-upsetting-people

    Don’t Be Afraid of Upsetting People – A Negative Reaction is Better than no Reaction

    August 11, 2015 | By: | In: Enabling Factors

    South Park is a highly successful cartoon sitcom created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone for the Comedy Central TV network. The show was launched in 1997 and quickly became notorious for its rude language, minimalist characters and black, surreal satire. It was aimed at an adult audience and poked fun at a wide range of topical or taboo subjects. South Park has received many accolades, including five Primetime Emmy Awards. It is the third longest-running cartoon series in the U.S. behind The Simpsons and Arthur. Yet it was very nearly cancelled when initial tests showed that most people did not like it.

  • innovation-management-incubators-accelerators

    Innovation Incubators and Accelerators: What Happens When They Go Wrong?

    July 6, 2015 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    I recently wrote an article that outlined a new approach to developing and supporting successful innovation incubators and accelerators within corporate organizations. The article appeared to have touched a nerve as I had a number of people reach out to me to offer their experiences with incubators/accelerators. While I received a range of opinions, I was actually most interested in the stories of failure.

  • innovation-stakeholder-management

    Innovation Stakeholder Management: Gain Success From My Failure

    April 15, 2015 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    In the second article on innovation stakeholder management, Anthony Ferrier focuses on two examples where he tried to generate broad support for innovation efforts with varying degrees of success. The lessons learned from these experiences provide insights for practitioners to successfully navigate stakeholder relations.

  • Two Ingredients for Pursuing Externally Focused Innovation

    Two Ingredients for Pursuing Externally Focused Innovation

    February 4, 2014 | By: | In: Strategies

    Organizations increasingly seek new forms of innovation—and, for themselves, transformation—by engaging in co-creation with the suppliers, clients, and consumers that comprise their value streams. What insights might be gained from organizations that have begun to realize their potential for leadership by embracing openness as a core element of their charter? In this article innovation architect Doug Collins reflects on the progress that the Beijing Genomics Institute (B.G.I.) has made on this front. What lessons does B.G.I. have to teach organizations that decide to paddle with the Digital Age currents as opposed to against them?

  • The Case of Vestas Wind Systems

    The Case of Vestas Wind Systems and Peter Drucker’s Five Deadly Sins of Business

    June 19, 2013 | By: | In: Enabling Factors

    The Nordic countries have a high number of start-up companies but are struggling with scaling their entrepreneurs, start-ups and innovations to global large-scale operations and companies. Yet, one Nordic company namely Denmark’s Vestas Wind Systems managed to become world-beater within the global wind turbine industry. But but after 2008 Vestas has experienced a near death experience and is struggling for survival. Vestas’ story holds important lessons for other Nordic companies, not only within the renewable energy industry. It will here be argued that had Vestas paid more attention to what the management guru Peter Drucker labeled the five deadly business sins Vestas might have avoided getting into dire straits.

  • Understanding your Innovation Culture – Case-Study from Swisslog

    Understanding your Innovation Culture – A Case-Study from Swisslog

    March 25, 2013 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    InnovationManagement is delighted to present a brand new Case Study highlighting the challenges of creating an innovation culture that: supports new product/service development initiatives, facilitates the creation of idea campaigns, spurs employee engagement and develops business value. In this article, Colin Nelson, Director of Strategic Consulting at HYPE Innovation, delves deeper into how collaborative innovation challenges were identified, managed and successfully overcome at Swisslog.

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