disruptive innovation

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    Disruptive Technologies for a Better Tomorrow

    July 10, 2015 | By: | In: Creative Leadership, Life Cycle Processes

    The fate of technology is not an undecipherable enigma that only engineers at Google, Amazon, or Samsung can solve. We can make better decisions in the present by developing a smarter understanding of the laws that govern technological evolution, of how it behaves over time, and what lies over the horizon. If we start thinking about these issues today, we can turn our discomfort into action.

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    The Creative Destruction of Your Job

    July 9, 2015 | By: | In: Strategies

    The rise of crowdsourcing, crowdfunding, crowdtransporting, crowdletting, etc., has transformed our economy. It has also ushered in the era of the shared economy. Previously marginalized people can now contribute, no matter how small, to all walks of life. It seems to be a fantastic opportunity for the world to access the untapped skill of the crowd. But what about the people whose jobs this makes redundant? Whither the expert?

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    Social Change Requires “Slow Entrepreneurship”

    June 26, 2015 | By: | In: Creative Leadership, Enabling Factors

    Fast entrepreneurship runs on adrenaline-infused quick returns and quick failures, burning through long nights of brainstorms and coding. It is exciting in its own right, but appropriate only for specific ventures. Slow Entrepreneurship treasures human relationships, health, and sanity, and strives for the good life. The vision for Slow Entrepreneurship is that by going through a learning program with the right mentoring and guidance, almost everybody with dedication will bring their project to fruition.

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    Disruptive Innovation Methodology: K³.P.I.

    June 18, 2015 | By: | In: Strategies

    How does the disruptive machine work? In this article Alex Chenevier offers a consolidated view of his previous publication, (before introducing his disruptive innovation methodology) by recording his research itinerary and extracting three intertwined progresses (the knowledge space, the path dependency and knowledge fusion), ultimately surfacing a unified model. The scientific equation of K³ey Performance Indicator℠ is perhaps the first definite, quantifiable and measurable model, and therefore applicable in business terms.

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    Do You Really Want Disruptive Innovation?

    April 29, 2015 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    What company wouldn’t want to come out with the next iPhone, online bookstore or Swiffer mop? In the right circumstances disruptive innovation can be a valid path to drive the long-term survival and growth of a mature organization. But Anthony Ferrier argues that most companies are not in that environment. They talk (a lot) about pursuing disruptive innovation, but the reality is that they don’t really want, or are able, to support it.

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    Five Forces of Complexity and Change

    April 27, 2015 | By: | In: The Innovation Formula

    In this chapter of The Innovation Formula Langdon Morris examines five forces of change: technology, science, culture, the human population and climate change. The convergence of these five trends largely defines the modern world and the market environment to which we must adapt and respond. Understanding them will set the framework for the choices you will have to make, and the processes you will implement in order to create and implement your own organization’s innovation process.

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    Transforming How We Work

    February 2, 2015 | By: | In: Agile Innovation

    The essence of agility is the ability to respond to new and different conditions. You cannot continue repeating the same old operating formula long beyond its utility or you will be left behind. Are you prepared to adapt to the profuse variety of new circumstances with new tactics and strategies? The principles of Agile that we examine in the next three chapter excerpts of Agile Innovation will help you understand what you need to do.

  • Disappointed By Innovation Results? It’s The Culture, Stupid!

    Disappointed By Innovation Results? It’s The Culture!

    September 9, 2013 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    Though companies invest into innovation they like results less and less. There seems to be a glass ceiling for driving innovation, which neither new tools and processes nor innovation consultants seem to crack. It is time to face the elephant in the room: company culture and its impact on innovation performance. Top management needs to learn deal with it. Then company culture will become a driver of innovation rather than getting in the way.

  • Risks of Incremental, Differential, Radical, and Breakthrough Innovation Projects

    Risks of Incremental, Differential, Radical, and Breakthrough Innovation Projects

    July 29, 2013 | By: | In: Enabling Factors

    From incremental to breakthrough innovation projects, managers need to handle different activities and with them dissimilar venues of risks. In this article the internal, external and hidden risks of incremental, differential, radical, and breakthrough innovation projects are identified and ranked accordingly. In addition, for every category a general innovation eco-system has been analyzed.

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    5 Key Points to Consider when Developing an Innovation Strategy

    July 3, 2013 | By: | In: Strategies

    From our talks with innovation management practitioners and business executives it seems that not many organizations have a well-defined and integrated innovation strategy. To find out more about how to go about creating and executing such a strategy, we spoke to Wouter Koetzier and Christopher Schorling at Acceture who encourage a very pragmatic and execution-oriented approach.

  • What Visionary Companies Do Differently

    What Visionary Companies Do Differently

    July 1, 2013 | By: | In: Strategies

    Visionary companies do not only try to see into the future – they create the future. The history of innovation is scattered with examples of misjudgments regarding the dynamics of new technology. Less than two years before Polaroid’s bankruptcy, Morgan Stanley made the following statement: “We are upgrading Polaroid to Outperform from Neutral based on the company’s new product performance…

  • Why Good Ideas Stem from Irritating Problems?

    Be an A-Tension Seeker: Why Good Ideas Stem from Irritating Problems?

    March 4, 2013 | By: | In: Strategies

    All too often we see companies coming to us with a new technological advancement that they are very excited about. Sadly, having a new technology does not guarantee a winning innovation. One needs to work hard at the front end to understand what the consumer needs and how the current market offer isn’t meeting those needs. Only against this backdrop can we hope to bring an idea to market that will be truly disruptive. The following article explains.

  • Illustration by Benoit Crouzet

    Emerging Market Disruptive Innovations

    January 11, 2013 | By: | In: Life Cycle Processes

    Companies located in developing countries are currently serving billions of local consumers with innovative and inexpensive products. What happens when more of those companies make the leap into more developed markets?

  • Innovation Management from around the web

    How Disruptive Will Innovations from Emerging Markets Be?

    November 19, 2012 | By: | In: Around the Web

    Companies located in developing countries are currently serving billions of local consumers with innovative and inexpensive products. What happens when more of those companies make the leap into more developed markets?

  • Innovation Management from around the web

    How to Turn A Nasty Surprise Into the Next Disruptive Idea

    September 4, 2012 | By: | In: Around the Web

    Most companies view surprises as things to be avoided. Even positive surprises are considered fortunate anomalies, far from being the cornerstone of any real strategy. The underlying assumption is that predictability and control are good, and uncertainty is bad. No wonder every management book on Amazon with the word “surprise” in its title is about how to prevent the phenomenon. But here’s the counterintuitive catch: If you want a breakthrough, something that really changes the game, surprise is actually the name of the game.

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