creativity

  • transformative-constraints-and-why-theyre-core-to-innovation-and-inventiveness

    Transformative Constraints — Why They’re Core to Innovation and Inventiveness

    November 25, 2016 | By: | In: Innovation Ecosystem, Podcast

    They say creativity loves constraint. In fact, if you ask professional, creative people about their “limitations” they naturally see them as exciting and stimulating. Engineers and software designers for instance see constraints as absolutely fundamental to problem solving. So why does constraint get such a bad wrap? Why do so many people see them as things to be managed and talked around and spun? In this week’s episode, Adam Morgan delves deep into this topic and explains his process for creating a framework to understand constraint and a process to help people successfully manage it.

  • how-innovation-equals-diversity-the-science-and-promise-of-an-inclusive-workplace

    How Innovation Equals Diversity: the Science and Promise of an Inclusive Workplace

    November 22, 2016 | By: | In: Enabling Factors, Organization & Culture

    Innovation may have a different meaning for every individual, but the true key to thinking outside the box lies in a diverse mindset. Allowing diversity into a business plan can be the secret to succeeding and achieving greatness. Don’t just take my word for it; evidence backs it up too.

  • top-diagramming-techniques-for-more-efficient-meetings

    Top Diagramming Techniques for more Efficient Meetings

    October 31, 2016 | By: | In: Creative Leadership, Enabling Factors

    Do you ever find yourself stuck in a meeting that’s stalling? Does the agenda seem to accomplish no tangible outcomes? Perhaps you find yourself wondering what’s next after an important summit, or frustrated with the lack of direction after a meaningful brainstorm or discussion.

  • how-humility-courage-and-empathy-help-navigate-the-creative-process

    How Humility, Courage, and Empathy Help Navigate the Creative Process

    October 26, 2016 | By: | In: Videos

    In this short talk, Seung Chan Lim (Slim) shares two stories from research he conducted at both the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University on what it means to “make something,” how it works as a creative process, and why it matters to our lives. The stories illustrate how humility & courage help the artist develop their empathy in relation to the “others” they interact with in the creative process.

  • foresight-extreme-creativity

    Foresight and Extreme Creativity: Strategy for the 21st Century

    October 25, 2016 | By: | In: Book Reviews

    Judging by experience, most top managers and innovators feel that they are in a maelstrom of change. For some, the rate of change and the magnitude of the consequences induced are so high that they feel a kind of ‘Present Shock’ – a term coined by Douglas Rushkoff, building upon Alvin Toffler’s concept of Future Shock, to describe the psychological impact that occurs when too much is happening simultaneously.

  • 15-innovative-meeting-formats-that-boost-creativity-and-strengthen-engagement

    15 Innovative Meeting Formats that Boost Creativity and Strengthen Engagement

    October 24, 2016 | By: | In: Enabling Factors, Organization & Culture

    How to organise a meeting in such a way that they result in creativity and energy? How to ensure that people are actively participating instead of being only passively attending meetings?

  • the-idea-generator

    15 Clever Thinking Tools to Create Winning Ideas Quickly

    October 20, 2016 | By: | In: Book Reviews

    When faced with tricky business challenges, success is often linked with the ability to create new and meaningfully different experiences that are better than existing alternatives. Being different involves change, and implementing change and rethinking working practices is a big task for individuals and organisations.

  • what-creativity-is-trying-to-tell-you

    What Creativity is Trying to Tell You

    October 19, 2016 | By: | In: Videos

    The creative process is as individual as it is universal. And yet there is a secret that creativity itself is yearning to tell us. Since the age of 9, Jonathan has performed as a singer, dancer, actor, and gone on to other creative ventures such as a playwright, director, choreographer, author, and voice over artist. Many different titles, one common thread: Creativity. He shares pivotal life experiences that define creativity for him and shows how you can tap into your own creativity on a daily basis, in whatever space and time you have.

  • Book-review-the-chameleon

    A New Approach to a Longstanding Team Building Tool

    October 11, 2016 | By: | In: Book Reviews

    After dedicating his professional career to teaching team building in companies followed by fifteen years of travelling the world to teach people about the DISC model, author and keynote speaker Merrick Rosenberg continues his mission in a new book that takes a more playful approach to personal assessment and learning behavioral differences.

  • imagination-starts-with-engagement

    Imagination Starts with Engagement

    October 5, 2016 | By: | In: Videos

    Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig explains how imagination requires active engagement, which reveals opportunities to envision what might be different. Imagination is the first stage of a four-step process that Seelig details for bringing ideas to life.

  • mad-scientist-and-creativity-labs

    Mad Scientists and Creativity Labs

    August 30, 2016 | By: | In: Collaborative Innovation, Organization & Culture

    Managing solitary and collaborative innovation: All innovation is based on creative ideas which are generated and developed by passionate people working alone and with others. Both solitary and collaborative work are important to the effective development of innovation in organizations. The key for leaders is to effectively promote both.

  • book-review-effective-decision-making

    Practical Guide for Decision-Makers and Problem-Solvers

    August 11, 2016 | By: | In: Book Reviews

    Corporate managers and entrepreneurs alike are accustomed to making tough decisions and seeking out the best possible solutions to everyday problems. It comes with the territory, but it’s not inherently easy. In order to reach a leadership position or own a company you probably have a knack for decision-making, but when the future of a business depends on the outcome, it’s important to reduce cognitive biases and calculate carefully.

  • intrapreneurs-beyond-the-innovation-theatre

    Intrapreneurship: Beyond Innovation Theater

    July 20, 2016 | By: | In: Interviews, Organization & Culture

    Despite their rising popularity, many companies are finding it difficult to yield sustainable results from their innovation and intrapreneurship programs. What does it take to go beyond the one-time initiative (or in rare some cases, the one-hit wonder)? We sat down with four speakers for the upcoming Intrapreneurship Conference in London, as a taster to what will be discussed during the day.

  • someone-may-have-solved-your-innovation-challenge

    Challenged by Innovation? Someone May Have Already Solved Your Problem

    July 12, 2016 | By: | In: Enabling Factors

    In 1946, Soviet inventor and science fiction writer Genrich Altshuller developed a methodology called TRIZ. It became known as “the theory of inventive problem-solving” and was based on a simple premise: across different disciplines and applications, the same challenges occur again and again. Unfortunately, people keep solving nearly identical problems from scratch. The main lesson from TRIZ is this: if you understand how your innovation challenge is similar to someone else’s, you can reapply solutions that already exist, instead of reinventing the wheel time and again.

  • collaborate-night-nature-new-ideas

    Collaborate with Night and Nature to Come up with New Ideas

    July 5, 2016 | By: | In: Enabling Factors, Innovation Psychology

    It is not widely known that most people, before the advent of the Industrial Revolution around 1800, tended to go to sleep shortly after nightfall but then get up around midnight for several hours before going back to sleep until dawn. Modern lab experiments have been able to reproduce this ancient, two-sleep pattern. Furthermore, there is separate anecdotal evidence that a number of people currently practice divided sleep as a natural habit, without the prompting of an experiment. Some of these people, in turn, use their nighttime wakefulness period for creative thought, writing and problem solving. The divided sleep phenomenon fits in very well with the dualistic and holistic principles of East Asian philosophy. One should ideally integrate work, thought and sleep with the natural light cycle in order to maximize the potential for individual creativity over the course of a full day and night.

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