back end of innovation

  • six-levers-for-solving-the-corporate-innovation-problem-part3

    Six Levers For Solving The Corporate Innovation Problem – Part 3

    May 2, 2016 | By: | In: Life Cycle Processes

    This is the third part of a three-part article series. We are investigating why – despite all the investments made into the early phase of innovation – innovation results remain disappointing. We call this the “corporate innovation problem”. In the first part we illustrated that companies are investing heavily into the early phase of innovation. In the second part, we provided some metrics on the corporate innovation problem and found that the corporate innovation problem actually consists of a “complexity” problem” and a “system problem”. In this article, we show six levers to change the “system problem” and think this is the way to solve the corporate innovation problem – and ultimately to increase innovation performance.

  • six-levers-for-change-part2

    Six Levers for Solving The Corporate Innovation Problem – Part 2

    April 25, 2016 | By: | In: Life Cycle Processes

    This is the second part of a three-part article series. In the first part we illustrated that firms are investing heavily into the early phase of innovation. In this second part we show that despite of all these investments, innovation results remain disappointing. We call this the “corporate innovation problem”. We provide some metrics and find that there are two root causes. In the upcoming third part we will suggest that six levers can be used to address one of the root causes. We believe that moving these levers can provide a solution to the corporate innovation problem – and ultimately lead to increased innovation performance.

  • Businessmen

    Six Levers for Solving the Corporate Innovation Problem – Part 1

    April 18, 2016 | By: | In: Life Cycle Processes

    Innovation is at the top of the Management Agenda for many companies. For excellence in innovation, companies have to master the chain of activities from discovering valuable insight into unmet customer needs to successful market adoption.

    However, despite large and growing investments into innovation, results remain disappointing. We call this the “corporate innovation problem”. In this 3-part article series we dig deeper into this problem and find that there are actually two root causes for it.

    We focus on one of the root causes – the “system problem” – and work out six levers of improvement. Acting on these levers offers a solution to the corporate innovation problem and ultimately increases innovation performance.

  • failure

    10 Ways to Reduce the Innovation Failure Rate

    December 4, 2015 | By: | In: Enabling Factors

    You are not able to stand still in this fast paced business environment, but most of the time innovation fails. Innovation process-expert Robert Cooper shows that of every seven new product/service projects, about four enter development, 1.5 are launched, and only one succeeds. Innovation is so difficult to master, indeed. I love to share with you five reasons why innovation goes wrong and give you ten ways to reduce your failure rate of innovation.

  • the-changing-back-end-of-innovation

    The Changing Back End of Innovation: Notes from the 2015 BEI Conference

    November 6, 2015 | By: | In: News

    The 2015 Back End of Innovation (BEI) conference recently took place in San Jose, California, with 150+ leaders from a wide range of organizations. It was a busy few days, but as expected, there were robust conversations and some exceptional presentations.

  • Back End Commitment: Now You Have the Idea

    Back End Commitment: Now You Have the Idea

    June 11, 2013 | By: | In: Organization & Culture

    People who sponsor collaborative innovation challenges establish a quid pro quo with the contributors and collaborators who comprise their communities. They agree to “do something” with the ideas that resonate with the community. What might “do something” entail, exactly? In this article innovation architect Doug Collins speaks to sponsor commitment on the back end of innovation, where ideas morph into tests, prototypes, and concepts.

  • Skunk Works® Meets Collaborative Innovation

    What’s That Smell? Skunk Works® Meets Collaborative Innovation

    March 5, 2013 | By: | In: Collaborative Innovation

    The front and back ends of innovation test us in different ways. At the front end we wrestle with, “What problem is worth solving?” At the back end we wrestle with, “How do deliver something that offers greater relative advantage than the next best alternative?” The back end can test us the most. We tap fully our potential for leadership to produce something new—something that, in its newness, disrupts the status quo. In this article, innovation architect Doug Collins explores the link between the Skunk Works®, a successful approach to the back end developed during World War II, in the context of today’s approach to collaborative innovation.

  • Engagement Is the ROI on the Front End of Innovation

    Engagement Is the ROI on the Front End of Innovation

    October 2, 2012 | By: | In: Collaborative Innovation

    Practicing collaborative innovation takes time, money, and attention. Organizational leaders ask practitioners to “show me the ROI.” How does the practice benefit the organization? In this article innovation architect Doug Collins explores how engagement serves as the return on the front end of the practice—and why engagement matters.

  • moving-from-the-front-to-back-end-of-innovation-idea-evaluation

    Moving from the Front to the Back End of Innovation: Idea Evaluation

    December 13, 2011 | By: | In: Collaborative Innovation

    People who practice collaborative innovation learn how to craft a series of engagements where participants can see the whole—the whole problem and the whole set of potential solutions—in order to reach a shared understanding of the way forward. In articulating the way forward, idea by idea, the group commits to a larger strategic intent. In this article, I describe a way in which practitioners can craft an engagement in which participants can reach a shared understanding of which ideas to pursue from the front to the back end of innovation.

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