Effective learning environments provide access to, create knowledge

The elearnspace Weblog contains an interesting recent post that asks the compelling question: “Where do you go when you need to learn/know something?“ It also suggests that “The answer to this question provides much insight into how people are coping with high information levels and high knowledge needs…and how corporations and higher education need to […]

The elearnspace Weblog contains an interesting recent post that asks the compelling question: “Where do you go when you need to learn/know something?“ It also suggests that “The answer to this question provides much insight into how people are coping with high information levels and high knowledge needs…and how corporations and higher education need to structure their training.” While this post is focused on knowledge management and learning, it has direct implications on how innovative an organization can become.

The author indicates that most training in workplaces is still geared toward courses and workshops — yet that source may be diminishing in importance compared to other avenues for finding information and acquiring knowledge, such as:

  • “Googling it” (searching Google to locate ideas, best practices or advice from others on how they have solved a similar problem)
  • Asking for advice from listservs, discussion boards or talking to an actual person
  • Buying a leading book on the topic

As workers’ sources for answers and knowledge evolve, how should learning environments be structured? Here are some suggestions from this blog posting:

“Some thoughts (apply to both physical and digital environments):

  • A space for gurus and beginners to connect (provide mentorship)
  • A space for self-expression (blog)
  • A space for debate and dialogue (discussion forum/listserv)
  • A space to search for archived knowledge
  • A space to learn in a structured manner (tutorials)

The environment in which these spaces are created becomes a community. The community provides the trust, connections, and serendipity to meet knowledge needs and foster innovation that allows for knowledge creation. Knowledge management is only partially about capturing and sharing knowledge. An effective learning environment also creates knowledge.”

If we can provide knowledge workers with tools like these to more effectively acquire, organize and share knowledge, then our opportunities for innovation should be vastly increased in our organizations (assuming, of course, that your organization’s culture actually values innovation).

Ad

STAY CONNECTED

 
Ad